Multiply: God’s Plan For His People

In a recent message, I opened my heart on a topic that has been building inside of me for a very long time.  The concept is not mine; it’s Biblical.  The terms are not mine; they’re adopted from others.  But as I seek God’s direction for the future of my leadership, and the church God allows me to pastor, I have a growing conviction and clarity about what needs to be done and what is at stake.  If we are to reach our world for Christ, and be truly obedient to the Great Commission, we must be committed, not just to growing by addition, but by multiplication.  Individually, we must multiply as disciples.  Collectively, we must multiply as churches.  There is simply no other way to effectively reach the world in time.  Multiplication has been God’s plan from the beginning of time.  Here is the message I shared:

Multiply - God's Plan For His People - Title

5 Reasons Why Cross-Cultural Integration Is Necessary In The Local Church

     No, I don’t have all the answers.  In fact, I realized long ago that I don’t really know all the right questions to ask.  So, with that disclaimer out of the way, let me give five reasons why I believe cross-cultural integration is necessary in the local church.

     The United States has always been a melting pot of cultures.  Unfortunately, what may be true of our nation is often not true of local churches.  It was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who famously said that eleven o’clock on Sunday morning was “the most segregated hour of Christian America.”  He was speaking of segregation between blacks and whites, but we are also seeing the same when it comes to cultures from around the world.  Christians know that we need to reach people of all nations, languages, and ethnic groups.  The challenge is: How?

     As you look around the church landscape in America you find that a predominant strategy is one of cultural segregation.  In other words, let’s have separate churches for whites, blacks, Hispanics, Asians, wealthy people, poor people, traditional people, contemporary people, younger people, older people.  If we do reach another culture or people group, let’s put them in another building, or have them worship at a different time than everyone else.  That way, everyone can play the music they like, speak the language they prefer, dress the way they like, and no one has to get out of their comfort zone or preference box.
     But, is that the New Testament way?  Is that how the Gospel is to shine in the world?  Is that what the Body of Christ is supposed to look like?
     I believe the church should be a living reflection of the Gospel message, which must include cultural integration.  People from different cultures ought to be able to come together in one Body to worship their one Savior and Lord.  Here’s why:
  1. In the Gospel, there are no cultural or gender differences (Galatians 3:28).  There are no Jews or Gentiles, slaves or free, male or female.  We are one in Christ.  Our churches should display that to the world.
  2. Cultural segregation feeds our selfishness and pride.  Our flesh and the world bombard us with the idea that life is all about us, that our ways are the best, and that we should get it “our way.”  Just like Frank Sinatra.  Just Burger King.  But not like Jesus.
  3. In Heaven, there will be no cultural segregation (Revelation 5:9; 7:9,  12).  People from every nationality, ethnic group, and language will be worshiping Jesus together.  We should be able to do so on Earth.
  4. Cultural segregation disobeys the Great Commission (Matthew 28:19-20; Mark 16:15; Acts 1:8).  No matter where you read the commandment of our Lord, it involves God’s children reaching and discipling all people groups.  Focusing on one culture exclusively was never part of the Plan.  In fact, it brought God’s intervention through persecution (Acts 8:1).
  5. Cultural integration is what God used to reach the world (Acts 11:19-26; 13:1-4).  Antioch is our model, not Jerusalem.  Through this local church, God sent out the first foreign missionary team.  Through their cultural integration, the Gospel eventually made it to America (and the world).

We must change our mindset.  We must align our heart and perspective with that of the Lord and the Kingdom of God, in light of dying souls all around us.  The need is too urgent to insist on our preferences and comfort zones.

 
What reasons could you add to this list?

Social Media: The New “Agora”?

The agora of Ephesus
If you study the first missionary movement in the New Testament, you will find the Apostle Paul traveling through Asia, then into Europe (modern-day Greece), engaging lost, pagan societies with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.  Though he often would first show up at the Jewish synagogues to engage His countrymen with the witness of the resurrected Messiah, as Paul ministered to an increasingly Gentile society, he would spend considerable time engaging with people in the local agoras.
 
In ancient Greek towns and cities, the agora was more than just a marketplace.  It was usually a natural, open space near the entrance to the acropolis, where the public would gather for social, political, and commercial business.  This was perhaps similar to the plazas that are found in virtually every town in Latin America.  The agora would be where vendors would set up shop, as Paul did when he sold tents in Corinth (Acts 18:1-3).  It was where philosophers and thinkers would debate ideas, as occurred prominently in Athens (Acts 17:17).  Even if you travel to Ancient Ephesus (modern-day Turkey), you will see, among the city ruins, a vast, open, rectangular area, which was the agora of the day.  The Apostle Paul and his missionary team spent time there, even in the lead up to the famous confrontation with Demetrius and the worshipers of the Temple of Diana (Acts 19).  In Phillipi, Paul and Silas were taken to the agora to face the rulers and to answer their accusers (Acts 16:19).
 
Why was this the place of choice?  It was where society gathered.  It was where people met.  It was where conversations, debates, and discussions of all kinds took place.  It was where Paul could engage the lost and build relationships and conversations that would open doors to speak of Jesus and the Resurrection.  If you want to reach people, you go to where they are, where they hang out, where they share their ideas and beliefs.
 
I believe that in today’s society, social media is becoming the new agora.  Yes, people still physically meet at sports arenas, city parks, and fitness centers.  But where are people gathering by the millions to share their thoughts, opinions, and daily life?  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and a growing list of digital applications.  How are they connecting?  On desktop and laptop computers, but more so on smartphones, tablets, and portable media devices.  As mundane as it may be at times, that is how today’s generations are seeking to connect.
 
We can dismiss it as a passing fad, or as superficial and shallow, but the reality is, that is where people are.  If we are serious about engaging people (in greater numbers than was ever possible before), we have to go where they are.  We have to build and join conversations and interactions.  It may not be our personal preference, but the conversations, discussions, and interactions are going to go on with or without you.  As ministers of the Gospel and servants of Jesus, vocational or volunteer, let me challenge you to be like Paul in his day.  Yes, be a part of the religious gatherings on the Lord’s day and whenever people are congregating for corporate worship.  But outside of those times, go to the agoras, start conversations, build relationships, point people to Jesus.

Observations from the Ancient Mission Field

During our recent trip to the Holy Land, God allowed my wife and I to personally experience, not just the lands where our Lord walked, but also the lands of pioneer missions in Greece, the Aegean Sea and the coast of Turkey. As a missionary kid and former missionary, I cannot describe how thrilling it was to see the places where the Apostle Paul took the Gospel message to foreign nations and cultures. We toured the open ruins of ancient Ephesus and Corinth, as well as Mars’ Hill in Athens.

My imagination came alive as I saw each open marketplace (agora), imagining Paul interacting with the vendors, tourists and athletes. My heart was burdened as I walked by the columns and doorways of massive temples dedicated to ancient Greek gods, that he too would have walked by. My stomach turned as we viewed the debris and artifacts from brothels and houses of temple prostitution. Paul stood as a pioneer missionary, sharing the message of forgiveness and hope through the resurrected Jesus, calling people to turn from their sin and live godly lives in the midst of a spiritually dark and perverse generation.

As we seek to take the Gospel to our local communities, and to unreached people groups around the world, it is often discouraging to see the rampant idolatry, paganism and blatant immorality. We are so few seeking to reach so many. Yet, the pioneer foreign missionary of the New Testament faced overwhelming challenges as well.

In Ephesus, Paul faced rejection and opposition, but still met regularly with a few believers, and discipled and trained them for two years. With God’s blessing, “all they which dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus, both Jews and Greeks” (Acts 19:10). This led to a city-wide revival that virtually collapsed the idolmaking industry of the region. In Corinth, Paul teamed up with fellow tentmakers selling tents to those traveling to the local athletic games of the peninsula. He built relationships, using their sports and religious culture to point their understanding to the truths of God. For 18 months, he taught God’s Word, which also produced negative social reaction because of the spiritual fruit. This rough, godless culture would challenge that local church for many years, but God was faithful to bring them through.

I don’t know the cultural and ministerial challenges you are facing, but you are not alone. God’s servants have walked this road before us. The same God who was faithful to them will be faithful to us. May we take to heart the words of this experienced missionary: “Let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not” (Galatians 6:9).

The Gospel In A Multicultural World

Romans 1:16

I believe the Gospel of Jesus Christ is the most powerful force on earth. I believe that Paul’s words in Romans 1:16 are true. The Gospel is the power of God unto salvation, but not to any particular nationality, ethnic group or social class, but to “everyone that believeth,” whether they be Jew or Gentile, male or female, wealthy or poor, black or white, city-slicker or redneck. I believe that when the world sees this unconditional, cross-cultural Gospel at work and on display as it ought to be, it sees the glory of Almighty God shining brightly in a dark world.

You see, the world knows all about division, prejudice and discrimination. Ever since the Tower of Babel, man has been divided by languages, nationalities, cultures and genetic differences – all originated and continued by the sin of pride. Not only that, but the world’s philosophy is all about preserving and protecting your personal preferences, getting things just the way you want it and like it, because “that’s what you deserve.” You can “have it your way,” whether it’s a hamburger or a local church.

But if I understand the Gospel correctly, all those manmade and sin-caused divisions are restored through the cross of Jesus Christ. People that are divided and different from each other come together into ONE BODY, the local, New Testament church (Matthew 28:19-20). In the Great Commission, we, as soldiers of Jesus Christ, have been commanded to make disciples, not just of our own family, nation, culture, ethnic group, language group, but of every people group that has been scattered about the earth, including around our own communities. And that is when God promises His power and presence to the end of time.

That is the beauty, glory and purpose of the Church of Jesus Christ, the power of the Gospel of Christ in a multicultural world. God wants His saved, regenerated, redeemed people to come together as one, to worship Jesus Christ, and to take His message to a lost and dying world, near and far. When the Gospel is transforming lives as it should, the church will be a church where “there is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). The walls come down!

So why don’t we see more of this in our local churches? The tragic reality is that this is simply not the norm in most churches. As I look all around me, at church ministry all over, we rarely get to see this on display (even in my own church). When you look around, you see:

I. A Divided Christianity

It is true that many churches have no genuine burden to reach other nations through world missions (no Faith promise program, no missions support, or it is a very low priority). But even more churches have no genuine burden to reach other ethnic groups and cultures that exist all around them. It’s like these people don’t even exist! I have observed that there is often just as much racism and prejudice within the Body of Christ as there is in the world. We tend to justify this or conveniently work around this sinful perspective by saying, “Well, those groups don’t like our kind of music. They prefer to worship in a different way. They speak a different language than we do.” So what do we do? We go about starting separate churches for whites, blacks, Hispanics, Asians, wealthy people, poor people, traditional people, contemporary people, younger people, older people. Everybody with a church that looks like them, sings like them, dresses like them, talks like them, worships like them – and nobody has to deny themselves or sacrifice their personal preferences to reach someone for Jesus! ARE YOU KIDDING ME? No wonder Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “It is appalling that the most segregated hour of Christian America is eleven o’clock on Sunday morning.” Where is that in the Bible? How can we pretend that this pleases God? How in the world does that bring glory to Jesus Christ, or display the true power of the Gospel, and send a message to a lost world that Jesus Christ forgives and unites? It’s every group for themselves.

By the way, that is not what it will be like in Heaven. In Heaven the worshipers will be singing about Jesus, saying, “Thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation” (Revelation 5:9). You will look across a sea of faces and see “a great multitude, which no man [can] number, of all nations, and kindreds, and people, and tongues, [standing] before the throne, and before the Lamb,” praising and worshipping “our God for ever and ever” (Revelation 7:9,12b). And that is how it ought to be here on earth – in the Body of Christ: local churches that reflect the world to which we minister.

But churches have always struggled with this. Despite understanding the Great Commission, God’s people, God’s soldiers, from the early days of the church, have been more about staying close to home, within our comfort zone, building ministry kingdoms and buildings, and building a name for themselves, instead of taking the Gospel to a multicultural world. We gravitate to what I call:

II. The Jerusalem Syndrome (Acts 1:4-8; 2:38-41; 5:27-28,42; 6:7)

The church at Jerusalem was the first church, by far the largest church, and the most blessed church when it came to an abundance of leaders. However, when it came to fulfilling the Great Commission of Jesus Christ, it was a poor example for us to follow. The church in Jerusalem was told to make disciples of all nations and ethnic groups (once they received Holy Spirit power), commanded to be witnesses unto Judea, Samaria, and the uttermost parts of the earth.f Yet the church in Jerusalem grew bigger and bigger and bigger (some estimate between 60-100,000), reaching their own people only. Numbers were good! The church was growing! They were being faithful to preach and teach in their local Jewish community, but were neglecting the Great Commission. The Commander had given the orders, but the soldiers weren’t fully obeying. That is, until God had to wake them up and shake them up by putting their very lives in danger and sending a persecution that literally scattered them around the world (Acts 8:1). Only then did Christians go out to spread the Gospel – yet still only to the Jews, people just like them. Their churches, for the most part, looked the same. They were Jewish churches.

Too many of our churches suffer from the Jerusalem Syndrome. We are faithful to preach and teach the Bible (even have growing numbers), but primarily to people just like us. We may even send money to reach other cultures in other places, but we are unwilling to reach other cultures in our own community. If the community around us begins to look different than us, we get so uncomfortable, we will either relocate to find a community that looks and acts like us, or we will dig in our heels to preserve our likes, culture and preferences, even if it means watching our churches wither and eventually die. I’ve seen it; you’ve seen it. Meanwhile there are real human souls that desperately need to hear of a Savior that loves them. They need to hear that in Christ we can be one. They need to see that we may have nothing else in common (humanly speaking), but if we know Jesus we are brothers and sisters, part of the family of God. We can come together to worship and serve the same Savior. They need to see people of genuine compassion, willing to do things differently if it means reaching people for Christ. The Jerusalem Syndrome can destroy the Lord’s work, and keep the glory of the Gospel from truly shining.

But I believe there is another church, that truly models and illustrates the Great Commission in action. It shows the true glory of the Gospel of Christ in a multicultural world. Instead of gravitating toward the Jerusalem Syndrome, I believe we need to be stirred and challenged by:

III. The Antioch Model (Acts 11:19-26)

Antioch was the third largest city in the Roman Empire, located about 500 miles north of Jerusalem. It was a Greek cultural center, on the Orontes River, close to a Mediterranean port (Seleucia), in the province of Syria (modern day Turkey).

It was here where we first see the glory and power of the Gospel in a multicultural world. The Jewish believers were forced to scatter and carry the Gospel to their Judea and Samaria, but they still had their cultural blinders on. They still only witnessed to Jews only (vs. 19). Some were Hellenist Jews, speaking Greek, living around the Roman Empire, but they were Jews nonetheless. Now these Christians began doing something new. They shared the Gospel of Christ to Gentiles. These “Grecians” (from what the context implies) were not Greek-speaking Jews (like in Jerusalem). They were actually Gentiles. Christians finally began to witness to other nationalities and people groups around them.

When this breakthrough in outreach and evangelism took place among God’s people we see God bless in extraordinary ways. When they stepped out of their comfort zone, stopped trying to reach only people just like them, they found that “the hand of the Lord was with them” and they experienced, not a revival, but a spiritual awakening (vs. 21). It was so incredible and amazing that word began to spread, and word reached the church back in Jerusalem. God was doing something out-of-the-box for them, something they had yet to experience, and they went to check it out. They were seeing the Romans 1:16 Gospel on full display. They were seeing the Great Commission carried out before their eyes. “The grace of God” had been poured out upon them (vs. 23).

It is no wonder that this church, with its culturally diverse ministry and leadership (including Jews, Africans, Italians), would be the church that would launch the first missionary movement (Acts 13:1-4). They had a true burden for the world, near and far. From this moment, from this church, the Gospel began to spread to the world, reaching nations, languages, people groups, and bringing together as one bodies of believers that virtually had nothing else in common; nothing, that is, but the blood of Jesus that has cleansed us from our sin, delivered us from the power of darkness, and transferred to the Kingdom of God’s Son. That is the glory of the Gospel in a multicultural world. It’s a little bit of Heaven on eart!

God has given me an ever growing burden to see God build more churches like Antioch, and for God to do so in the congregation where I serve. It grieves me to see such diverse cultures all around us, by the thousands, and yet most of our churches look nothing like any of them. When we do try to reach them, we want to keep them separate, apart, so they can do things their way and we can do things our way, and never truly becoming one body in Christ.

What is it going to take for the glorious Gospel to shine in our multicultural world? Persecution? Suffering? Divine discipline? Do we need to find ways to build better ministry bridges? To reach people that are all around us, yet seem invisible to us? To reach them, and not keep them isolated, but seek to integrate them as part of the Body? Do we need to be willing to leave our comfort zone? Do we need to seek God’s forgiveness for our prejudices, stubbornness and indifference? Do we need to be more flexible in our styles and attitudes? I don’t have the answers. But I know the heart of our Savior for a lost world, and, like Paul, “I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek.”

Lessons Learned

 I believe it would be fitting for me to share some personal thoughts and lessons learned from the opportunity our church, Vandalia Baptist Temple, recently had to host the World Baptist Fellowship Fall Meeting. The emphasis of this “semi-annual” meeting is always world missions, which is very close to my heart. My wife Megan and I accepted the opportunity with “fear and trembling,” and wanted to give our best for the Lord and His servants. We felt so inadequate, but trusted God to put people in place to help accomplish the task.

It was an overwhelming experience to see God at work. And that reminded me of some important truths:

  1. Planning is important, but God has to meet with us. We did our best to prepare and organize what we thought would be a blessing to God’s servants. Not everything came about the way we wanted or planned. But we knew that if anything of eternal value was to happen, God had to do it, and anoint every speaker, song and service with His Holy Spirit. I believe He did – to His glory!
  2. Prayer makes all the difference. If God has to meet with us and do a supernatural work, then we have to seek Him in prayer. Not just talk about it, but do it. Each service provided us the opportunity to pray over our pastors, college leaders, and missionaries. What a thrill to hear the voices of God’s servants joined in intercession! I believe God’s presence was tangible during those sacred moments.
  3. Teamwork is essential. I know the host pastor often gets much of the “thanks,” but an event like this is never the work of one person, just like every other ministry for the Lord. I could not have done it without my wife, our staff, and our amazing church family. But beyond that, we received constant encouragement, advice and assistance from our Mission Director and fellow pastors. Teamwork is indeed essential, and it is something which I believe God blesses.
  4. There is so much to be done. As I opened my heart and shared ideas for our fellowship to engage the next generation of missionaries, I seemed to have “hit a nerve” (in a positive sense). There is a growing sense of urgency to take whatever steps are necessary to be more effective in world evangelism and in reaching the next generation for Jesus Christ. We face many challenges as churches and as a fellowship, but God has not called us to a task for which He will not equip us. May we work together, pursue excellence, and focus on the cause which unites us all as Great Commission pastors, missionaries, and churches.

It was our honor to serve the World Baptist Fellowship through this meeting. The 26 missionary families and dozens of pastors who came were such an encouragement to our people. God even used this meeting to lead our congregation to its highest Faith Promise commitment in our church’s history! I appreciate every word and expression of gratitude and encouragement that we have since received. God has branded these truths on my heart, and for that I praise Him. Let us “SO RUN” (I Cor. 9:24).

Why Missions Trips Matter

I doubt very many people would disagree with the fact that missions trips are important. They are a positive experience for everyone involved. They are often used of God to change the course of a believer’s life and ministry. But let’s face it: planning and executing a missions trip is a lot of work.

I believe there are many pastors and youth pastors that love the thought of taking a group from their church to visit a missionary on the field. But the thought of planning, organizing, fund raising, and doing everything else is just too much to add to their plate. It’s a good idea … for the future.

If that is you, let me take a moment to share why missions trips matter. More importantly, why they matter enough to not put them off. They are far too important. Our latest group trip to the Peten jungles of Guatemala reminded me of a few things:

 

  1. Church members will be revived. Our team of twelve included a deacon, choir members, teachers, an usher, family members, a college student, and a teen. God stirred their hearts for the kingdom of God, to get out of their comfort zones, and to have a renewed passion for the lost in their community. What church does not desperately need this?
  2. Missionaries will be encouraged. By the providence of God, we were in Guatemala at a moment when our host missionary family was facing a serious ministry challenge. At one moment we were surrounding the missionary wife praying for her husband’s life and protection! Beyond that, they had gotten some disturbing news from “back home.” This young family was faithfully serving their Lord in a remote part of the world, sacrificing more than we will ever know, and we were able to be up close to love them in a personal way. What missionary does not desperately need this?
  3. Pastors will be refocused. On a personal note, each time I am privileged to visit a missionary on the field, God refocuses my heart on what is most important in ministry. I preach with more passion. I lead with more clarity. I see the “forest” instead of just the “trees.” It makes me wonder how I could have gotten so distracted. What pastor does not desperately need this?

 

I believe missions trips ought to be an ongoing part of the ministry life of a local church. Don’t just dream about it – do something. Contact a missionary. Add it to your calendar. Post a sign-up sheet. Prepare for God to change your life and your church.